Mareike Wiening


Drummer, composer and bandleader Mareike Wiening has distinguished herself bringing “a planar modulating harmonic language and a propulsive drift” (New York Times) to the most compelling jazz music of today. Wiening’s music was described as “thoroughly modern, progressive jazz … many layers that unfold with each repeated hearing; she will most definitely become a leading part of the jazz scene in the years to come.” (All About Jazz)

Wiening is based in New York as well as Cologne, Germany and has performed with artists throughout the United States, Europe and South America. She has appeared with John Zorn’s COBRA, German Jazz Youth Orchestra and multiple Off-Broadway Shows. Wiening has worked with renowned musicians such as Rich Perry, Stefon Harris, Dan Tepfer, Dayna Stephens, Fabian Almazan, Johannes Enders, Ben Wendel, Florian Weber, Adrian Mears, among others.

Wiening has performed with artists throughout the United States, Europe and South America. She has appeared with John Zorn’s COBRA, German Jazz Youth Orchestra and multiple Off-Broadway Shows. Wiening has worked with renowned musicians such as Rich Perry, Stefon Harris, Dan Tepfer, Dayna Stephens, Fabian Almazan, Johannes Enders, Lutz Häfner, Florian Weber, Adrien Mears, among others.

Besides leading her own quintet featuring Rich Perry, Glenn Zaleski, Alex Goodman and Johannes Felscher, she is also an in demand side-woman in the New York jazz scene. Venues such as Cornelia Street Café, The Jazz Gallery, Blue Note NYC, German Consulate, Carnegie Hall, Unterfahrt Munich, Bird’s Eye Basel and Birdland Neuburg are only a few of her regular performance places.

A native German, Ms. Wiening received her bachelor of music degree from the University of Performing Arts Mannheim and the Rhythmic Conservatory of Music Copenhagen. She received her master of music degree from the University of Performing Arts Mannheim and New York University Ms. Wiening attended the Banff International Jazz Workshop in Banff, Canada, and the International Annual Jazz Meeting with musical director Dave Liebman in Sao Paul, Brazil. She has studied with Stefon Harris, Michael Küttner, Tony Moreno, Guillermo Klein, Henry Cole, Marilyn Mazur, among others.

Mareike released her debut album, Metropolis Paradise, in November 2019 and a live EP Live at Bird’s Eye Basel in February 2021.

She endorses MEINL cymbals and MEINL Sticks & Brushes exclusively.


RELEASES


CONTACTS

PRESS
Antje Hübner for Hubtone PR
antje.huebner@hubtonepr.com

WEBSITE
mareikewiening.com


PRESS QUOTES

It’s basically the jazz equivalent of Manhattanhenge: lush and romantic, but also subdued and very tasteful.” – Phil Freeman, Stereogum

Metropolis Paradise is an impressive debut. Wiening’s compositions are rich and varied.” – Mark Sullivan, All About Jazz

In the ongoing conversation about best debut album of the year, I hope due consideration goes to drummer Mareike Wiening. … Every piece on Metropolis Paradise is a Wiening original, and they cover an appealing range of style — from Brad Mehldau-esque waltzes (For a Good Day) to knotty polyrhythmic workouts (Misconception).” – Nate Chinen, WGBO

“Clearly this recording – a celebrated one by the enormously gifted Mareike Wiening – offers musical riches together with performances by all at hand to rival the very best; and this should delight listeners eager for something both musically substantial and free-swinging as well.”
Raul da Gama, JazzdaGama

Metropolis Paradise merits special attention. … Wiening’s subtle melodies like “2 in 1” and “Viewpoints” are elaborated by shifting unisons, layered harmonies and cycles of call and response. Her classical background is also apparent in the formal notated piano patterns woven through her charts. It may even be audible in her clean, orderly, understated drumwork.” – Thomas Conrad, New York City Jazz Record

Stylish modern jazz.” – Brooklyn Rail

“Ms. Wiening … plays original music with a planar, modulating harmonic language and a propulsive drift. Her language is part chamber jazz, part big-boned rock percussion, part free improvisation.”Giovanni Russonello, New York Times